Webinar on Protein Intake The Myth and the Facts Presented by Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD, Director of Inpatient Diabetes Management

This presentation by Dr. Osama Hamdy of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, MA discusses the myth and the facts of protein intake.

In general, for diabetic patients with normal renal function, protein should make up 15-20% of total energy intake and high protein diets are generally not recommended for diabetes patients.

Dr. Hamdy also discusses the relationship between protein intake and kidney function in diabetic patients.

Watching this presentation will shed light on the origin of protein recommendations and the metabolic relationship of different proteins to blood glucose.

Take-home messages include:

  • Protein intake should be calculated as gram/kg of body weight, irrespective of total calorie intake
  • Reduction of protein intake does not affect microalbumin excretion rate or GFR in patients with diabetes and end-stage renal disease
  • Increase protein intake improves blood glucose, increases insulin response and reduces A1C in patients with type 2 diabetes
  • Increased protein intake enhances weight reduction, reduces fat mass, and helps in maintaining weight loss when combined with low GI carbohydrates.

Listen to the podcast below

Share this:

Resources from our research partners and collaborations

Sign up for the MHICN Newsletter

Your Weekly Nutrition Bulletin features the latest content on topics spanning our therapeutic platforms from MHICN research staff and clinical partners. Receive videos, clinical modules, research reviews and more by email each week. Sign up here or view previous weeks' newsletters.

Subscribe View Newsletter Archives

Continuing Education

MHICN has partnered with leaders in preventive medicine, integrative medicine, and medical education to provide cutting-edge education for providers of all backgrounds with an interest in functional and lifestyle medicine. We are excited to share these free educational modules featuring podcasts, videos, and print articles.

Learn More